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The Stink of Brimstone

shadows-of-brimstone

 

Okay, folks, enough is enough.

 

For anyone just joining this article, I posted an unpopular opinion about a Kickstarter I supported. As I expected, quite a few folks don’t agree. That’s fine. I don’t expect you to agree. Hell, I expected many of you to call me every name in the book, and you did. That’s fine. Sticks and stones, and all of that.

 

I even expected a few hate mails telling me how much of a dick I am. That’s fine. I received plenty of them.

 

What I did NOT expect is for someone to look me up on Facebook and then send a vaguely threatening email that included me, and my fiancee. That’s where I draw the line.

 

I took down the article. It can’t hurt you anymore.

 

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No ‘Bones’ about it!

reaper

 

One of my biggest regrets in gaming is not making better use of miniatures. Most of the time I end up cannibalizing my Descent and Dragonstrike board games for tabletop minis, but I die a bit on the inside when I tell my players that those Skeletons with the bows are actually armored warriors…because they’re totally not.

 

 

Not having enough proper minis for gaming always boiled down to “meh. I don’t really have the cash to spend on minis.” I’m fairly certain I just heard all of the scoffing from every Warhammer player reading this. Well, that’s nice that you spend HUNDREDS of dollars playing Warhammer, but I’m pretty damned sure that it’s the only game you play. With Games Workshop‘s practically criminal pricing, it’s the only game you can AFFORD to play.
Even non-GW minis are friggin’ expensive; that is, if you want high-quality minis. Sure, you can make due with some of the pre-painted plastic minis that Pathfinder usually ships in randomized boxes, but you’re never certain of what minis you’re going to get. After all, what in the hell am I going to do with 8 copies of a “half-elf Cleric?” Host a revival? Don’t get me wrong; I’m a fan of Pathfinder minis…sure, they’re cheap, pre-painted plastic that some may turn their nose up at, but they work great for any gaming table. I just don’t care for the random  element for buying minis. At $12 a box, those minis still boil down to $3 a pop for crap I don’t need.

 
Most metal, high-detail miniatures run between 5 to 7 dollars per mini…or upwards of 10 to 12 (and higher) if you’re Games Workshop. This is standard for a single medium mini. This means it just cost between $25-35 to just have a party of 5 heroes on the table. Thus, for those of us who aren’t financially blessed, miniatures are a huge luxury of gaming. Read the rest of this entry

Conjuring Cash with Kickstarters

The love of money may be the root of evil, but the possession of money is the necessity of progress. No grand idea or project ever saw fruition from empty coffers (unless you’re a member of the government). It is unfortunate that most folks who have great ideas are not people of means.

 
There are many great games out there that are nothing more than a small prototype lovingly hand-crafted, or a mere thought in the mind of an aspiring game designer. Unless you’re a game-publishing mega giant like Fantasy Flight Games, attempting to publish a game without a great deal of money is practically doomed to failure.

 
Thus, the aquisition of funds is the greatest hurdle to the aspiring game-maker. Read the rest of this entry

A Run Worth Funding

Hoi, Chummers!

I’ve been on quite the Shadowrun kick lately. It’s not surprising, considering it’s number 2 on my list of favorite Role-Playing settings of all time. Last week, I had the pleasure of sharing my story of how I got into the world of Shadowrun, and my excitement to see Catalyst Games’ new SHADOWRUN 2050 Campaign book. This week, I still focus on Shadowrun, but I switch gears.

I was going over the daily divination in the Poor Wizard’s Almanac, and it has become apparent to me that the year 2013 is going to be dubbed “Year of the Shadowrunner.” Why? Well, because 2013 is going to be big for all Sixth World fans. Shadowrun has essentially been a dead property when it comes to electronic media. The last good Shadowrun titles came out almost 20 years ago, and the latest one didn’t even hit American or European shores. What’s that, you say? Yes, there was one made in 2007, but notice I was talking about a “GOOD” Shadowrun game.

Now, some of you may have heard that Jordan Weisman, one of the original creators of Shadowrun, has re-acquired the license for Shadowrun. This is great news, but it’s also OLD news. He and a little company called Harebrained Schemes are making a brand new Shadowrun game… Read the rest of this entry