Monthly Archives: October 2013

No ‘Bones’ about it!

reaper

 

One of my biggest regrets in gaming is not making better use of miniatures. Most of the time I end up cannibalizing my Descent and Dragonstrike board games for tabletop minis, but I die a bit on the inside when I tell my players that those Skeletons with the bows are actually armored warriors…because they’re totally not.

 

 

Not having enough proper minis for gaming always boiled down to “meh. I don’t really have the cash to spend on minis.” I’m fairly certain I just heard all of the scoffing from every Warhammer player reading this. Well, that’s nice that you spend HUNDREDS of dollars playing Warhammer, but I’m pretty damned sure that it’s the only game you play. With Games Workshop‘s practically criminal pricing, it’s the only game you can AFFORD to play.
Even non-GW minis are friggin’ expensive; that is, if you want high-quality minis. Sure, you can make due with some of the pre-painted plastic minis that Pathfinder usually ships in randomized boxes, but you’re never certain of what minis you’re going to get. After all, what in the hell am I going to do with 8 copies of a “half-elf Cleric?” Host a revival? Don’t get me wrong; I’m a fan of Pathfinder minis…sure, they’re cheap, pre-painted plastic that some may turn their nose up at, but they work great for any gaming table. I just don’t care for the random  element for buying minis. At $12 a box, those minis still boil down to $3 a pop for crap I don’t need.

 
Most metal, high-detail miniatures run between 5 to 7 dollars per mini…or upwards of 10 to 12 (and higher) if you’re Games Workshop. This is standard for a single medium mini. This means it just cost between $25-35 to just have a party of 5 heroes on the table. Thus, for those of us who aren’t financially blessed, miniatures are a huge luxury of gaming. Read the rest of this entry

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